326 B High Street West Moose Jaw, SK

From the Desk of Warren Michelson June 1, 2018

June 1, 2018 View this email in your browser
shield FROM THE DESK OF WARREN MICHELSON, MLA

#40 SNOWBIRD SQUADRON CADETS CEREMONIAL REVIEW

 

             Emma Cherney

 


RESIDENTS REMINDED TO LEAVE YOUNG WILD ANIMALS ALONE

Seeing young animals such as fawns, ducklings, rabbits or songbirds can be exciting, but there are reasons to leave them alone, even if they appear helpless or lost.


In the majority of cases, these young animals are not abandoned or deserted, and the mother is nearby watching.  Young animals and birds are purposely placed into seclusion by their mothers to protect them from predators.  As an example, young deer or moose are virtually odorless making them less likely to be located by a predator.


Anytime a young wild animal comes into contact with humans, its chance for survival decreases significantly.


Wildlife may also carry and transmit infectious diseases to people, such as rabies or West Nile Virus.

It is illegal to take wild animals home.  Only wildlife rehabilitators are licensed to care for orphaned and injured animals.  They are trained to make sure animals are given appropriate care and nutrition so they have the best chance of survival when they are released back into the wild.

Government of Saskatchewan conservation officers want to emphasize a simple message to well-intentioned people who want to rescue what appear to be orphaned young animals this time of year – don’t touch them.


A young animal should only be picked up if the parent is found dead nearby, or in unnatural situations such as a young songbird found on a doorstep.  In that case, the young bird could be moved to the closest suitable habitat.


To determine if a deer fawn is truly orphaned, please consider these indicators:

  • Has it been lying in the same position for more than 10 hours?
  • Is it vocal?
  • Is it covered in insects?
  • Is it wet?  Being covered by the morning dew may indicate it has been there for a prolonged period.

If there are obvious signs of injury, or that it has been orphaned, contact your local conservation officer.


Residents are also reminded to steer clear of adult wildlife, such as deer or moose that sometimes wander into urban areas.  Large crowds will stress the animal, and this could lead to a potentially dangerous situation.  Give wildlife their space.


June is one of the peak months for vehicle accidents involving wildlife.  So it is important for drivers to slow down and watch for wildlife crossing the roadways.  Be more vigilant around dusk and in the evening, as animal movement increases after dark.


PHEASANT CHICKS

Pheasant chicks hatched at local schools and are to be released later this summer when the chicks have matured.

Legislative Session Wraps with New Legislation and Budget on Track

The spring sitting of the legislative session wrapped up today.  It was Premier Scott Moe’s first legislative session as Saskatchewan’s new Premier and he said the government focused on the priorities of Saskatchewan people.


“I’m honoured to have completed my first spring session as Premier and I will continue to stand up for Saskatchewan as we face important issues including the fight against the federal carbon tax,” Moe said.


During this spring session, the Government of Saskatchewan launched a constitutional reference case in the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal challenging the federal government’s ability to impose a carbon tax on the province.  The Government of Saskatchewan also continued to advocate for the construction of the federally-approved Trans Mountain pipeline.


“During this session, we also introduced and passed a budget that keeps our government on track to a return to balance next year, while still investing in the priorities of the people of Saskatchewan, like health care and education,” Moe said.


The government passed 60 pieces of legislation during the spring sitting, including:

  • Protecting the right to school choice by invoking the notwithstanding clause of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and legislation to provide certainty to parents and students that government can continue funding students who attend Catholic separate schools regardless of their religious affiliation;
  • The framework to allow the federal government’s legalization of cannabis;
  • Amended The Privacy Act for greater protection against the unauthorized electronic distribution of intimate images;
  • Legislation to make consequences more severe for drivers who are impaired and who transport children;
  • Legislation to allow the establishment of ride sharing services in Saskatchewan communities;
  • Creation of an interpersonal violence leave of 10 unpaid days;
  • Creation of a new provincial park in the Porcupine Hills area;
  • Value-added agriculture incentives to improve investment attraction; and
  • Updating animal protection enforcement.

“I think it was a good session for our government and the people of Saskatchewan, but now it’s time for MLAs to head back to our constituencies to continue listening to the people we represent,” Moe said.


CANNABIS RETAILERS SELECTED

The operators for the province’s 51 cannabis retail store permits have now been selected.  More than two-thirds of these successful applicants are from Saskatchewan or have operations in the province.


“This represents the next step in the process of having a privately-operated cannabis retail system carefully regulated by SLGA,” Minister Responsible for SLGA Gene Makowsky said.  “There was a lot of interest in the public Request for Proposal process, resulting in many new businesses that will invest in our province.”


The successful proponents were selected through a two phase Request for Proposal (RFP) process that began in March.  The first phase involved a screening for qualifications focused on financial and sales/inventory tracking systems.  All those that qualified entered the second phase of the process which was a lottery draw to select the successful operators.  KPMG was engaged to provide oversight and monitor the entire RFP process.


The successful proponents have 45 days to begin the permitting process.  As a condition of their permit, retail cannabis permittees must be operating within 12 months of legalization.  Permits will not take effect until legalization occurs.


Cannabis retail stores must be standalone operations, selling only cannabis, cannabis accessories and ancillary items as defined by SLGA.  Alcohol sales will not be permitted in cannabis stores.  Cannabis retail locations are subject to local municipal zoning bylaws.


The included backgrounder lists the successful proponents and the communities where they will operate.

THE STORM THAT LEFT A FAIR AMOUNT OF HAIL BEHIND

REPORT FROM THE LEGISLATURE


The spring sitting of the legislature focused on the priorities of Saskatchewan people as we face important issues.


The fight against the federal carbon tax continues with the Government of Saskatchewan launching a constitutional reference case in the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal challenging the Government of Canada’s ability to impose a carbon tax on the province.


The Government of Saskatchewan also continued to advocate for the construction of the federally-approved Trans Mountain pipeline.


During this session, we also introduced and passed a budget that keeps our government on track to a return to balance next year, while still investing in the priorities of the people of Saskatchewan.


The government passed 60 pieces of legislation during the spring sitting, including:

  • Protecting the right to school choice by invoking the notwithstanding clause of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and legislation to provide certainty to parents and students that government can continue funding students who attend Catholic separate schools regardless of their religious affiliation;
  • The framework to allow the federal government’s legalization of cannabis;
  • Amendments to The Privacy Act for greater protection against the unauthorized electronic distribution of intimate images;
  • Legislation to make consequences more severe for drivers who are impaired and who transport children;
  • Legislation to allow the establishment of ride sharing services in Saskatchewan communities;
  • Creation of an interpersonal violence leave of 10 unpaid days;
  • Creation of a new provincial park in the Porcupine Hills area;
  • Value-added agriculture incentives to improve investment attraction; and
  • Updating animal protection enforcement.

The spring session was Premier Scott Moe’s first as Saskatchewan’s new Premier. This was also the first session for the new Leader of the Opposition.


The spring sitting was a time for renewal.


On that very first day, the new NDP Leader stood in his place and stated that he wanted to “do politics differently”. However, after 42 sitting days, it is clear that “doing politics differently” looks a lot like the same old NDP.


The Opposition failed to tell Saskatchewan people how they would create jobs and grow our economy. In fact, the only plan put forward was the Leader’s platform which proposes $2.5 billion a year in new spending with absolutely no plan to pay for it.


Through the spring sitting, the Opposition continued to support the Justin Trudeau carbon tax being imposed on families and businesses in our province, and their leader even called our fight against the carbon tax “a pointless crusade”.


The spring sitting was a good session for our government and the people of Saskatchewan. We now turn our full attention back to our constituencies to continue listening and standing up for the people we represent.


HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY IN FULL SWING IN THE SOUTHWEST


A $7.1 million surfacing project on Highway 4 near Cadillac and an $8.3 million paving project on Highway 42 near Eyebrow have now been completed.  This is on top of about $15 million worth of highway and bridge work, which is currently underway in the southwest part of the province.


“Our government continues to invest in highway and infrastructure projects that improve safety for people travelling in southwestern Saskatchewan, with this in mind, I urge travellers to follow the signage, slow down and respect the work zones,” Highways and Infrastructure Minister David Marit said.  “With summer weather on its way and people beginning to head out to the lake, we are pleased to announce the trip along Highway 42 to Lake Diefenbaker will be much smoother.”


Some of the other highway and infrastructure projects in the southwest this week include:

  • Paving on Highway 4 north of Swift Current to Stewart Valley;
  • Bridge work on Highway 4 over the South Saskatchewan River at Saskatchewan Landing;
  • Surfacing near Maple Creek on Highway 21 between the junctions of Highways 221 and 271; and
  • Surfacing on Highway 32 northwest of Cabri to the Shackleton Access.

If you’re planning to travel, check the Highway Hotline at

www.saskatchewan.ca/highwayhotline, which provides up-to-date information on construction, emergency road closures, the status of ferries, barges and other road activities.  Information is also available by calling 511.


A weekly highway construction update is also published on 
www.saskatchewan.ca/residents/transportation/highway-construction-projects/weekly-highway-construction-update to provide the travelling public with the latest details on projects underway to help plan safe and efficient travel.  You can also report a highway work zone signing problem by calling 306-244-5535.


Travellers need to obey signs, stay alert and slow to 60 km/hr through the work zone.  There may be cases when workers are not present that still require you to slow down.  A sharp pavement drop or loose stones during a seal coat are examples of hazards that warrant a slower posted speed.


The Government of Saskatchewan has invested more than $8 billion in transportation infrastructure since 2008, improving more than 12,000 km of Saskatchewan highways.


CROP REPORT FOR THE PERIOD May 22 TO 28, 2018

Thanks to another week of relatively good conditions, 91 per cent of the crop is now in the ground.  This is up from 70 per cent last week and remains well ahead of the five-year (2013-2017) seeding average of 81 per cent for this time of year.


The southwest region is the most advanced with 95 per cent of the crop seeded.  Ninety-three per cent is seeded in the southeast, 92 per cent in the west-central region, 90 per cent in the northwest, 87 per cent in the northeast and 86 per cent in the east-central region.


Ninety-eight per cent of lentils, 94 per cent of durum, 92 per cent of spring wheat, 90 per cent of soybeans, 88 per cent of canola, 85 per cent of barley and 84 per cent of flax have now been seeded.


Scattered rain showers brought varying amounts of rain this past week, helping to temporarily alleviate concerns of dry field conditions.  Rainfall ranged from trace amounts to 72 mm in the Humboldt area with many areas reporting about 25 mm or less.  While significant rain is still needed in the majority of the province to help crops emerge and hay land and pasture establish, some areas in the northeast have excess moisture.


Topsoil moisture conditions have slightly improved with recent rainfall.  Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on crop land are rated as one per cent surplus, 51 per cent adequate, 36 per cent short and 12 per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 38 per cent adequate, 44 per cent short and 18 per cent very short.


Overall, emerged crops are in poor-to-good condition, but emergence has been patchy and delayed by dry field conditions.  The majority of crop damage this past week was caused by strong winds, lack of moisture and insects such as flea beetles and cutworms in canola.  Localized hail was also reported in some areas.


Farmers are busy finishing up seeding, picking rocks and starting in-crop pesticide applications.


SaskPower says there were 15 reported cases of farm machinery contacting electrical equipment in the last week.  That brings the total for May to 143.  Most farm-related incidents happen during seeding.  SaskPower reminds producers to be aware of their surroundings at all times and plan ahead.  More safety information is available at www.saskpower.com/safety.


A complete, printable version of the Crop Report is available online at 
www.saskatchewan.ca/crop-reportFollow the 2018 Crop Report on Twitter at @SKAgriculture.


WHAT’S HAPPENING IN MOOSE JAW

Friday June 1, 2018

What: Millers vs Swift Current

Time:   7:00 p.m. 
Place:  Ross Well Park

Saturday, June 2, 2018

What: Mining wk 50th Annual Emergency Response/Mine Rescue Skills Competition

Time:   6:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.  
Place:  Mosaic

What:  YMCA Healthy Kids Day

Time:  10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. 
Place:  Fairford St. Location 

What: Moose Jaw Shrine Club 9th Annual Children’s Festival
Time:  10:00 a.m.
Place:  Western Development Museum

Magic acts, Singalongs, Petting Zoo, Carnival Games and Ride Thomas the Train! Face Painting, Hotdogs, Drinks and Cotton Candy! Everyone is welcome to Tour the Museum as well! Free Tickets available at Tourism Moose Jaw, South Hill Fine Foods, Western Development Museum, Western Dodge and Heritage Insurance

Sunday, June 3, 2018

What:  Sukanen Ship – Spring Fling Show n Shine

Time:   10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. 
Place:   Sukanen Ship  Museum 

What:   Annual Decoration Day

Time:    10:30 a.m. 
Place:    Rosedale Cemetery 
Short service to follow at 11:00  a.m.
Parade at 2:00 p.m. – Crescent Park
Cenotaph – 1:45 p.m.
BBQ Hamburger and salad

 

UPCOMING EVENTS:

Keep MJ Alive! – Doug Griffith
Wed. June 6
7:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Performing Arts Theatre
$25/ ticket – MJ & District Chamber of Commerce

Professional Bull Riders (PBR)

Sat. June 9

7:00 p.m.

$20 plus fees



Habitat for Humanity 2nd Annual Gala

Sat. June 16

Cocktails @ 5:30 p.m.

Welcome @ 6:15 p.m.

Dinner @ 6:45 p.m.

Dancing @ 9:00 p.m.

Featuring The New Montagues

$60/ TICKET

Derek 306-692-5050


The Saskatchewan 55+ Games 
July 10th- 12th