326 B High Street West Moose Jaw, SK

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From the Desk of Warren Michelson June 22, 2018

June 22, 2018 View this email in your browser
shield FROM THE DESK OF WARREN MICHELSON, MLA

Good News on National Indigenous Peoples Day

I was asked to attend the announcement of the Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) formalizing the expansion of a mentorship program for Indigenous post-secondary students, while at the same time celebrating the success the program has seen in its first four years.


Through SRC’s Aboriginal Mentorship Program (AMP), First Nations, Inuit and Métis post-secondary students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) can connect with an SRC mentor in the same or similar disciplines and gain work experience through a hands-on summer job at SRC.


Since its inception in 2015, fifteen students have been welcomed into the program – two of which accepted permanent, full-time employment with SRC upon graduation and are still with the organization today.


Unfortunately because of this event, I missed the National Indigenous Peoples Day celebrations in Moose Jaw. 


Government House Celebrates National Indigenous Peoples Day

Thursday, June 21 marked National Indigenous Peoples Day, and Government House celebrated the occasion with a traditional ground blessing and dance performance for all to attend.


National Indigenous Peoples Day was first proclaimed in 1996 by then Governor General of Canada, Roméo LeBlanc.  The day is for all Canadians to recognize and celebrate the unique heritage, diverse cultures, and outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples.  The occasion is observed on or near the summer solstice, a traditional time for generations of Indigenous peoples and communities to celebrate their culture.


The public were invited to attend the free event, held outdoors on the Ceremonial Circle in front of Government House.  Elder Betty McKenna offered a prayer, and a traditional chicken dance was performed alongside multi-generational drumming group, Buffalo Lodge.


Lieutenant Governor W. Thomas Molloy  gave remarks in the company of representatives from Saskatchewan Indigenous organizations and communities.


Following the event, the public were encouraged to explore the J.E.N. Wiebe Interpretive Centre on the second floor of Government House.  June is National Indigenous History month, a great time to experience Saskatchewan’s past through interactive multi-media presentations, games and murals.


World Refugee Day, June 20

The World Refugee Day events on June 20 were very informative.  The stories of some of those who came to Moose Jaw as refugees are truly inspiring.  Thank you to the Moose Jaw Multicultural Council for organizing the event.


Hometown Fair Parade
It was a perfect evening for a parade on Thursday.  A good crowd were there to enjoy the floats and parade entries to start off the Hometown Fair.

A Touching Moment on the Road to Nipawin

On my way to a caucus meeting in Nipawin, I drove by the site of the Humboldt Broncos bus accident.  Seeing the outpouring of support in the memorial created there was very moving.  My thoughts and prayers continue to be with all those affected by this tragedy.


Premier Scott Moe Calls for Changes to Equalization Program


Moe has written to Prime Minister Trudeau and the other nine provincial premiers to propose a simple change to the complicated equalization formula that would make equalization fairer.


Moe calls his proposal the 50-50 Formula.  Under this formula, the overall amount of equalization and relative fiscal capacity of each province would continue to be calculated in the same manner it is now, using the same revenue sources.  Half of the total equalization pool would be distributed on this basis.


The other half would be distributed on a per capita basis, based on the population of each province relative to the other provinces.  This would ensure that all provinces receive some amount of funding from the equalization program, while continuing to ensure the “have not” provinces receive significantly more relative to their size, based on their relative fiscal capacity.


Even under this proposal, the benefit to Saskatchewan remains quite small.  Saskatchewan would receive about $300 million, or about 1.6 per cent of the overall equalization amount.


Moe noted that while the Saskatchewan government does not pay money into the equalization program, Saskatchewan taxpayers do through their federal taxes like income tax and GST.  On average, every Canadian contributes a little over $500 per year to the $19 billion equalization program, which means Saskatchewan taxpayers contribute about $600 million per year.

The Whistle is Back

Sunday June 17th saw the return of the bells, whistles, sounds and smells of a steam locomotive at the Western Development Museum.  Families, and kids of all ages can again have the special experience of riding a train with the last steam locomotive in the province.

Short Line 101 had been running since the late 70s, but two years ago the tracks became very deteriorated to the point the engine couldn’t be run anymore. Thanks to a sponsorship agreement with K+S Potash Canada, the Short Line will be here to stay under the new name “K+S Potash Canada Short Line 101”.

To find times to catch a ride on the K+S Potash Canada Short Line 101, you can visit the Museum’s Website.

CHAB and Moose Jaw Coop Team Up to Welcome Summer

Summer officially arrived at 4:07am Thursday and Golden West Broadcasting and Moose Jaw Coop helped to kick off summer with their annual Hot Dog Day.They offered free hotdogs and pop to anyone stopping by during the lunch hour on Thursday.  Thanks for lunch, CHAB and Coop!


First Nations School Holds Competitions to Display Learning in Robotics from RoboYOU Program
The results of five months of learning robotics, computer coding and digital literacy skills were shown this week in competitions by students at the Cowessess Community Educational Centre.


The games marked the end of the pilot run of Innovation Saskatchewan’s RoboYOU program launched in February 2018, to provide First Nations students in rural communities with exposure to robotics for learning, creating and playing.  Eighty-five students from Grades 5-9 in both the Cowessess Community Educational Centre and Chief Kahkewistahaw Community School completed the RoboYOU program, which provided them with experiential learning in programming robotics—giving them the opportunity to explore their creativity, solve problems and enhance their critical thinking skills.  Participants in both schools received certificates at the completion of the program.


Developed with assistance from the Ministry of Education, various schools as well as science and technology consultants from school divisions in Saskatchewan, one of RoboYOU’s objectives is to expose students to learning and career opportunities in the science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM fields.


With the completion of the RoboYOU pilot, Innovation Saskatchewan will review the program and determine the next steps going forward.

Crop Report for the Period June 12 to June 18, 2018

Across the province, seventy-five per cent of the pulse crops and fall and spring cereals are at their normal stages of development, while 70 per cent of the oilseeds are at their normal stages of development for this time of year, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report.


Many areas reported rain showers this week, with large amounts recorded in the west-central region.  The Rosthern area received 54 mm of rain, the Kindersley and Moosomin areas 30 mm, the Biggar area 35 mm and the Frobisher area 20 mm.  Many areas in the southwestern and west-central regions remain very dry, including Gull Lake, Shaunavon, Outlook and Dinsmore, which have received less than 25 mm of rain since April 1.


Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as four per cent surplus, 67 per cent adequate, 24 per cent short and five per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 61 per cent adequate, 28 per cent short and 11 per cent very short.  Topsoil moisture is in shortest supply in the southwest.  Crops, hay and pasture in these areas are affected by the dry conditions.  In the parts of the south that received rain over the last few weeks, annual crop conditions have improved; however, hay yield is expected to be lower than average and pastures are expected to have reduced carrying capacity going into the summer months.


Less wind this week allowed producers to do some in-crop weed control, which had been interrupted in previous weeks due to strong winds.


The majority of crop damage this week was due to lack of moisture.  Cutworms are still causing damage in some areas.


A complete, printable version of the Crop Report is available online at 
http://www.saskatchewan.ca/crop-report.

Agriculture Minister Lyle Stewart and Environment Minister Dustin Duncan have jointly proclaimed June 17 to 23, 2018, as Native Prairie Appreciation Week in Saskatchewan.


This year marks the 20th annual Native Prairie Appreciation Week, an event unique to Saskatchewan.  It is celebrated every year in partnership with the Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan (SK PCAP) as a way to raise awareness and appreciation of the province’s native prairie ecosystems.


“Landowners, government and non-government agencies all have a role to play in the stewardship and protection of native prairie,” Stewart said.  “Over the years, Saskatchewan’s farming and ranching families have demonstrated what it means to be responsible stewards of the land, playing a big role in the ongoing celebration of Saskatchewan prairie.”


“Saskatchewan’s native prairie is one of the features that makes our province so unique,” Duncan said.  “This week provides us with an opportunity to acknowledge the biologically diverse and natural landscapes in our province and the important role they play in sustaining biodiversity, storing carbon and building resilience to climate change.”


“Native Prairie Appreciation Week is an opportunity for all Saskatchewan residents to recognize and celebrate the diverse value of native prairie,” SK PCAP Manager Diego Steinaker said.  “We hope the week inspires people across the province to not only learn about conservation, but what native prairie has to offer.”


To celebrate, SK PCAP has planned a variety of activities across the province, including urban awareness booths at farmers’ markets in Regina, Saskatoon and Swift Current, as well as an activity checklist and a youth poster contest.


WHAT’S HAPPENING IN MOOSE JAW

Friday June 22, 2018

What: Moose Jaw Hometown Fair

Time:  3 – 10 pm
Place:  Exhibition Grounds

https://www.moosejawex.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/2018-fair-schedules-REVISED.pdf

Saturday, June 23, 2018

What: Moose Jaw Hometown Fair

Time:  All day, opens at 9 am
Place:  Exhibition Grounds

https://www.moosejawex.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/2018-fair-schedules-REVISED.pdf

What: Western Region 3 Metis Cultural Rendez-Vous

Time:  8 am – 6 pm
Place: Wildlife Federation Hall 
Call (306) 631-6058 to register

What: CarFit Clinic for Senior Drivers

Time:  1 – 4 pm
Place:  Town ‘n Country Mall Parking Lot

Sunday, June 24, 2018

What: Moose Jaw Hometown Fair

Time:  All day, opens at 9 am
Place:  Exhibition Grounds

https://www.moosejawex.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/2018-fair-schedules-REVISED.pdf

 

UPCOMING EVENTS:

Anavets Club BBQ Supper
June 26  5:30 – 6:30 pm
Reserve tickets by June 23  (306) 692-4412

Labyrinth of Peace Guided Meditation
June 26, 5:30 – 8:30 pm
324 MacDonald St.

Wakamow Valley Guided Bird Walk
June 27, 7 pm Wellesley Pavilion

Concert in the Park
June 27, 7 pm

The Saskatchewan 55+ Games 

July 10th- 12th

Moose Jaw Express June 20, 2018

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Congratulations Graduates

Grade 12 students are completing their final high school exams and looking forward to their graduation ceremonies next week.  Graduation from high school is a momentous occasion, in many ways a rite of passage. It signifies a step into the adult world.

My advice to graduates is to search your interests and strengths, find your passion, and pursue it. There are so many opportunities for a promising future for graduates here in our community and right across our province.

Saskatchewan is a great place to live and to work; or advancing into continued learning with excellent options for post-secondary education. Students can take advantage of more than 20 programs at Saskatchewan Polytechnic in Moose Jaw. The Schools of Business; Construction; Hospitality and Tourism; Information and Communication Technology; Mining, Energy, and Manufacturing; Natural Resources and Built Environment; and the School of Transportation prepare students for fulfilling careers. Many of the credits gained can be transferred to university degree programs if so chosen. Online courses and apprenticeships also expand the possibilities.

I am always honoured to be invited to nearby Briercrest College for special occasions and events. Briercrest also has degree courses to offer. Saskatchewan has an impressive variety of ways to pursue high quality post-secondary education. There are six affiliated colleges, four federated colleges, eight regional colleges, and two aboriginal and northern educational institutions located throughout the province and associated with the Universities of Regina and Saskatchewan. Private vocational schools offer over 160 programs in a many different careers.

Education is the engine that drives our knowledge-based economy. Our government believes investing in education is one of the best things we can do which is why we are committed to keeping post-secondary education accessible and affordable.

The Saskatchewan Advantage Scholarship is an example of our government’s commitment to the future of our students and our province. The Saskatchewan Advantage Scholarship provides all new grade 12 graduates, including Adult Basic Education and GED® students, up to $500 per year, to a lifetime maximum of $2,000, to be applied to their tuition costs at a Saskatchewan post-secondary institution. If students choose to live and work in Saskatchewan after graduating, the Graduate Retention Program rewards these graduates by providing a tax credit of up to $20,000 for their education costs.

Student loans are available through the Canada-Saskatchewan Integrated Student Loan program.

Students will be automatically considered for grants from both the Governments of Canada and Saskatchewan when applying for a student loan. Grant amounts are calculated based on the number of weeks of study and family income. Extensive information about post-secondary education opportunities and financial support is available at http://www.saskatchewan.ca/residents/education-and-learning.

Congratulations to all Moose Jaw high school graduates.  I wish you all the best for a successful and fulfilling future as you seek the skills and knowledge needed to pursue your dreams.

Premier Scott Moe made a visit to Moose Jaw last Thursday. Thank you to all who came to the breakfast and welcomed him, and to the Chamber of Commerce for hosting the event. Those in attendance appreciated the Premier’s presentation and reassurance that he will represent the best interests of our province and continue to fight the imposition of a federal carbon tax that would increase our cost of living, hurt our competitiveness and harm our provincial economy.

From the Desk of Warren Michelson June 15, 2018

June 15, 2018 View this email in your browser
shield FROM THE DESK OF WARREN MICHELSON, MLA

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY 

MOOSE JAW FORD OFFICIAL
TWO-DAY GRAND
RE-OPENING

Left: Shaun Airey – Manager

Bottom:  MJ Ford Management Staff


SASKATCHEWAN’S MINIMUM WAGE ONCE AGAIN SET TO INCREASE IN OCTOBER


The minimum wage in Saskatchewan will increase to $11.06 an hour from $10.96 an hour on October 1, 2018.


The increase is the 10th since this government took office.  An indexation formula has been used to calculate increases in the minimum wage since 2011.


The province also continues to have a low personal income tax rate, ensuring low income earners, including minimum wage earners, keep more of their money.


Saskatchewan’s legislation provides for an annual review based on changes to the Consumer Price Index and the average hourly wage for the previous year.  Any changes to the minimum wage are to be announced by June 30. Changes take effect October 1.


For more information on minimum wage, visit 
www.saskatchewan.ca.
STARS AIR AMBULANCE FUNDRAISER 
The Suburban Hotel on Diefenbaker Drive was host to the STARS AIR AMBULANCE fundraiser.
Thank you.

MINISTRY PROVIDES FUNDING TO RCMP FOR PERMANENT CRIME REDUCTION TEAMS


The Ministry of Corrections and Policing is providing roughly $1.6 million to the RCMP to permanently expand the Crime Reduction Team (CRT) initiative in Saskatchewan.


This funding will be used for 14 full-time team members made up of 10 police officers and four support staff.  Funding for these positions is provided through the Provincial Policing Services Agreement, which funds 70 per cent of all RCMP positions in Saskatchewan.  These additional staff will comprise two permanent CRTs—one operating out of Prince Albert and one operating out of North Battleford—that will be established this fall.  The RCMP will maintain a temporary CRT to ensure enforcement activities continue until the permanent teams are operational.


“The RCMP has seen great success with this project since they started the CRT as a pilot last February, and we’re happy to support the establishment of these two permanent teams,” Corrections and Policing Minister Christine Tell said.  “We look forward to seeing the positive impact this program will have in Saskatchewan’s rural communities.”


The CRT’s main goal will be to conduct targeted enforcement (also known as “hotspotting”) based on intelligence, analysis of crime trends and consultations with community leaders.  This may include high visibility patrols; tracking chronic offenders; tackling street-gang activity and executing arrest warrants.


“We have heard directly from our detachments and communities the value of the Crime Reduction Team,” Saskatchewan RCMP Commanding Officer A/Commr. Curtis Zablocki said.  “The team, made up of members with specialized enforcement and investigation skills, deliver focused, high-intensity policing to communities that need it most.  Their efforts have yielded results, taking drugs, firearms and criminals off the streets of our Saskatchewan communities.”


The CRT will work in partnership with other RCMP detachments and municipal law enforcement agencies to ensure a co-ordinated response to rural crime.


It will also collaborate with communities and other partner agencies to address root causes of crime and develop long-term solutions to ensuring community safety.


The CRT initiative began as a pilot program in early February.  Since being established, it has executed 193 arrest warrants dealing with 384 Criminal Code charges.  This includes charges against 26 known gang members and affiliates.
U of S. Provincial Tour Spots in Moose Jaw
Debra Pozega Osburn; PhD/ Vice President with professor of agriculture Jeff Schoenu.

SASKATCHEWAN HIGHWAY PATROL READY TO HIT THE ROAD IN JULY

Commercial vehicle enforcement officers in Saskatchewan have a new mandate and a new name.  The Saskatchewan Highway Patrol is replacing the former Commercial Vehicle Enforcement group.


The name change reflects the newly expanded role for the Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure’s enforcement team.  The new name and mandate will come into effect on July 1, 2018.


“Last year, it was announced that the Protection and Response Team (PRT) would be created to help reduce crime in rural Saskatchewan,” Highways and Infrastructure Minister David Marit said.  “Officers from Commercial Vehicle Enforcement were identified as members of the team that would provide support to the RCMP and municipal police forces and they will soon be ready to do that.”


Although protecting the provincial highway system through commercial vehicle enforcement will remain the primary function for Saskatchewan Highway Patrol officers, they’re receiving expanded responsibilities to support their role on the PRT.


These responsibilities include:

  • Responding to 911 calls;
  • Investigating impaired drivers;
  • Enforcing speed limits and other traffic violations – inside and outside of work zones;
  • Taking action when someone is found committing an offence;
  • Responding to motor vehicle accidents; and
  • Investigating vehicles hauling livestock to ensure the health and welfare of the animals.

“We are pleased to see the additional new officers capable of responding to incidents in rural areas,” SARM President Ray Orb said.  “Our membership has repeatedly noted that a timely response to emergency situations and addressing rural crime is a high priority.”


Members of the Saskatchewan Highway Patrol have received extensive training in recent months to prepare them for their new responsibilities.  They’ve received training in the enhanced use of force, firearms and tactics for 911 calls, such as clearing a house of suspects and high-risk vehicle stops.  Officers have also received training in dealing with people with mental health issues, as well as training in the Criminal Code and the requirements for the collection and control of evidence.


HELPING SENIORS PROTECT THEIR HARD EARNED MONEY

The Financial and Consumer Affairs Authority (FCAA) wants to protect seniors from financial exploitation and fraud.

“We know seniors are trusting, often have accumulated wealth, and tend not to report crimes, which makes them a target for fraudsters or exploitive relatives who want to take advantage of them,” FCAA Securities Division Director Dean Murrison said.  “We want seniors to know the warning signs of financial abuse so they can recognize when someone is targeting them, as well as preventative steps they can take to protect themselves and their finances.”


Too frequently people provide personal information such as credit card numbers, banking information or PINs to people they do not know and end up losing money to fraudsters or unethical relatives.


Here are some tips for seniors so they can protect themselves from exploitation and fraud:

  • Be very cautious when speaking to people on the phone if you do not know them.
  • If someone emails, texts or calls asking for personal or banking information, do not provide the information.
  • Never wire money to a stranger.
  • Do not download email attachments from people you don’t know.

Seniors, relatives and caregivers, can visit www.fcaa.gov.sk.ca/financial-literacy/seniors/senior-financial-abuse to find out more information about preventative steps, red flags and who to contact.


PREMIERS BREAKFAST

Premier Moe spoke about the Federal Carbon Tax and the significant challenge it poses to Saskatchewan residents and businesses. 

MANUFACTURING SHIPMENTS RISE IN APRIL


Saskatchewan’s manufacturing shipments were up 16.2 per cent (seasonally adjusted) to $1.53 billion in April 2018 when compared to April 2017.  This represents the second highest percentage increase among the provinces.  Nationally, sales were up 3.6 per cent over the same period.

“This significant increase in the year-over-year comparison shows the resiliency and diversity of our economy,” Trade and Export Development Minister Jeremy Harrison said.  “Manufacturing is one of the key components of Saskatchewan’s economy, creating jobs and investment across the province.”


On a month-over-month basis, shipments were up 6.7 per cent between March 2018 and April 2018, the highest percentage increase among the provinces.  On a national basis, manufacturing shipments dropped 1.3 per cent.


Year-over-year increases (seasonally unadjusted) were reported for food manufacturing (up 23.5 per cent); wood products (up 20.8 per cent); fabricated metal manufacturing (up 16.3 per cent) and; machinery manufacturing (up 10.1 per cent).


Crop Report for the Period June 5 to June 11, 2018

Rain across most of the province has helped to alleviate dry topsoil moisture conditions.  Areas in the southeast, which was one of the drier regions over the past couple of months, received large amounts that caused flooding.  The moisture will help to replenish pasture and encourage hay growth.


Seeding operations are mostly complete, but there are a few fields being seeded for green feed and silage.
Germination is patchy in some regions due to dry conditions, but the recent rain has helped.


The northwestern region reported large amounts of rain this week.  The St. Walburg area recorded 154 mm and the Barthel 93 mm.  In the southwest, areas around Hazenmore received 100 mm.  Areas around Lucky Lake, Outlook, Shaunavon, Dinsmore and Rosetown remain very dry, having received less than 25 mm of rain since April 1.


Topsoil moisture conditions have improved in much of the province, thanks to the recent rainfall.  Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as nine per cent surplus, 73 per cent adequate, 16 per cent short and two per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as six per cent surplus, 68 per cent adequate, 15 per cent short and 11 per cent very short.


Crop conditions have improved with the recent moisture.  The majority of crops are in good to fair condition.  Provincially, 74 per cent of spring cereals, 70 per cent of oilseeds and 76 per cent of pulse crops are at normal stages of development for this time of year.  Strong winds are slowing down in-crop weed control operations.


The majority of crop damage this past week was due to localized flooding, lack of moisture, hail, strong winds and insects such as flea beetles and cutworms.


A complete, printable version of the Crop Report is available online at 
www.saskatchewan.ca/crop-report.


Follow the 2018 Crop Report on Twitter at @SKAgriculture.


WHAT’S HAPPENING IN MOOSE JAW

Friday June 15, 2018

What: Millers vs Fort McMurray

Time:  7:00 p.m. 
Place: Ross Wells

Saturday, June 16, 2018

What: MJ Ford Grand- Reopening Pancake Breakfast 

Time:  8:00 p.m. 
Place:  MJ Ford

What: MJ Guided Tours 

Time: 10:30 a.m
Place: The Souvenir Shop – 207 Main St. N. 

What: Legion Show and Shine and Beer Gardens

Time:  11 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Place:  Legion Parking Lot
What: Habitat for Humanity 2nd Annual Gala
Time:  Cocktails @ 5:30 p.m.

Welcome @ 6:15 p.m.

Dinner @ 6:45 p.m.

Dancing @ 9:00 p.m.

Featuring The New Montagues

$60/ TICKET

Derek 306-692-5050
Place: 
What: The Bent Wrench Car Show Shine and Swap Meet  

Time:   6:00 p.m. 
Place:  Main St. 

Sunday, June 17, 2018

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY!

What:  The Bent Wrench Run Cruise Night 

Time:   11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Place:  Wakamow Valley

What:  The Whistle is Back in MJ – Father’s Day Special 

Time:   1-4 p.m. 
Place:  WDM

What:  Millers vs Regina

Time:   7:00 p.m. 
Place:  Ross Wells Park
  

UPCOMING EVENTS:

The Saskatchewan 55+ Games 

July 10th- 12th

Report from the Legislature June 14, 2018

Summer at the Legislative Building

Saskatchewan’s population has reached another all-time high, topping 1.17 million for the first time. Once known as a great place to be from, Saskatchewan is the place to be.

According to Statistics Canada data, Saskatchewan grew by 1,488 people in the first quarter of 2018 – an increase of 11,691 people in the past year, and 157,806 more people in the past decade.

Saskatchewan’s population has now grown in 48 consecutive quarters.

More people than ever calling Saskatchewan home is a clear sign our province and our economy are on track.

Our government has a vision of a growing province where our children, and their children, have every opportunity to get an education, start their careers, raise their families and build a life.

Students across our province are finishing exams and preparing for graduation. They are ready to further their education, find employment and put their skills and knowledge to work.

Our government believes investing in education is one of the best things we can do and we are committed to keeping post-secondary education accessible and affordable.

The Saskatchewan Advantage Scholarship is an example of our government’s commitment to the future of our students and our province. It provides high school grads with up to $500 per year, for four years, towards tuition at a Saskatchewan post-secondary institution.

The Saskatchewan Advantage Scholarship is expected to help over 21,000 Saskatchewan students reduce their tuition costs this year.

If students choose to live and work in Saskatchewan after graduating, the Graduate Retention Program provides a tax credit of up to $20,000 for their education costs.

Congratulations to the Class of 2018, and best wishes for a bright future in Saskatchewan.

People around the province are finalizing summer plans, many of which will include visits to Saskatchewan Provincial Parks.

Calendars with special event and program details are now available online so that visitors can plan their trips ahead of time and enjoy the wide range of activities offered.

Each park offers activities that are different from the last, from group-led games, crafts, stories and sand castle contests to campfire singalongs, sunset paddles and special musical performances.

Throughout the 2018 camping season, Camp-Easy equipped campsites will be available at Buffalo Pound, Echo Valley and Pike Lake provincial parks.

These sites include a large canvas tent on a wooden platform, six sleeping cots, a screened dining tent, a camp stove and propane tank, a lantern, wash bins, camp chairs and roasting sticks.

Closely located to urban centres, Camp-Easy sites are more accessible to families and new campers who do not own equipment or aren’t sure if camping is for them but would like to give it a try.

Another unique experience brings Top of Formnature and comfort together in a brand new, Mongolian-style yurt in Great Blue Heron Provincial Park. The yurt is a great opportunity to experience beautiful Anglin Lake in comfort and style with minimal packing and preparation required.

The yurt, which sits on a large deck and is furnished with a queen-sized bed and two double-sized futons, comes equipped with a table and chairs, small fridge, electrical outlet, electric heater and battery-powered lamps. Washrooms, showers and potable water taps are located nearby.

The yurt is ideal for anyone looking for a unique adventure, or for those who may not have much outdoor experience but are interested in a getaway beyond the city limits.

To learn more about all of the programs and new offerings in Saskatchewan Provincial Parks this summer, be sure to visit saskparks.net.

Moose Jaw Express June 13, 2018

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Celebrating Indigenous Culture

 June is National Indigenous History Month and June 21 is National Indigenous Peoples Day. We are all treaty people, and there are many opportunities to develop a better understanding of the treaty, and to understand and appreciate Indigenous culture.  Many public events now begin with acknowledging that we are on Treaty 4 territory and the homeland of the Metis people.  This is a positive direction, but it hardly needs to be said that there is much to be done to bridge gaps and advance reconciliation.

We can appreciate the work of those engaged in building relationships between the Indigenous community and those from other cultures. The Wakamow Aboriginal Community Association organizes events throughout the year to encourage building of relationships and an appreciation of Indigenous and Metis culture.  SaskPolytech has a tremendous focus on Indigenous student success and building bridges between their indigenous students and the people of Moose Jaw.  Our local schools have a number of projects and events that enhance understanding and relationships with those of Indigenous heritage around us.  Palliser Heights School has been a leader in that endeavor.

Moose Jaw was very fortunate to be chosen as the host city for the Atamiskakewak 2018 National Gathering this past April. The event was planned as a way to bridge the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people.  About 4500 people attended the event, which included educational speakers on a wide variety of topics, interactive events, an Artisan Fair, and an impressive Pow Wow to finish off the week.  I was privileged to attend some of these very worthwhile events.  These kinds of occasions increase awareness of the richness of this culture and give a glimpse of what can be learnt when relationships are built.

It will take continued effort from the citizens of Saskatchewan, but there are some encouraging signs of narrowing the social and economic gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous groups. It is known that education and employment are essential to closing these gaps.  In the recent budget, approximately $200 million of program funding was targeted for primarily First Nations and Métis organizations or individuals. Much of it was focused on post-secondary and career training.  This will help to continue the positive direction we have seen in recent years.  The number of First Nations, Métis and Inuit students competing post-secondary programs has grown 35 per cent since 2013.  Off-reserve Aboriginal employment has increased significantly in recent years.

Last September, mâmawêyatitân centre opened in Regina. The facility includes a new Scott Collegiate High School, a 33 space child care centre, a city recreational complex, a public library branch, a community policing centre, and a First Nations Elders’ ceremonial room.  It’s a model for future projects that are developed with a better understanding of Indigenous culture and needs.  Following Their Voices, a made-in-Saskatchewan initiative to improve educational achievement and graduation rates of First Nations, Métis and Inuit students, expanded to 27 schools in the 2017-2018 school year.

The Royal Saskatchewan Museum in Regina has organized a great lineup of events to recognize National Indigenous History Month. The exhibits and events celebrate Saskatchewan’s rich Indigenous history and culture, and embrace contemporary issues.  This is a great activity for families and folks of all ages.  During the month of June, and especially on National Indigenous Peoples Day, it is an opportunity to learn, participate and contribute to the spirit of reconciliation.

From the Desk of Warren Michelson June 8, 2018

June 8, 2018 View this email in your browser
shield FROM THE DESK OF WARREN MICHELSON, MLA

PROVIDENCE PLACE LONG SERVICE AND RETIREMENT RECOGNITION DINNER
  Long service and retired workers were recognized for their services at the Providence Place recognition dinner.
A combined total of 724 years of service where recognized.

MINING SKILLS COMPETITION 

JUNE PUBLIC OFFERING SHOWS SASKATCHEWAN PETROLEUM OPPORTUNITIES IN HIGH DEMAND

The average price per hectare in Saskatchewan is currently $725, the highest when compared to public offerings held to date in Alberta and British Columbia.


“Industry’s investment in petroleum and natural gas rights in Saskatchewan is a good measure of the opportunity and potential that exists in our province’s oil and gas sector,” Energy and Resources Minister Bronwyn Eyre said.  “Dollars invested by this industry support Saskatchewan jobs, communities, and our province’s economic future.”


One exploration licence in southeast Saskatchewan received a bonus bid of $10,511,566.  This parcel was purchased by Stomp Energy Ltd. and is prospective for multiple targets including the Ratcliffe Beds of the Madison Group and the Bakken, Torquay, and Red River Formations.


Forty parcels totalling 11,400 hectares were sold for $3,454,719 in the Kindersley area.  These parcels are prospective for oil and gas in the Viking Formation, Mannville Group, and Bakken Formation.  Cougar Creek Land Ltd. bid $608,948 to acquire a 243 hectare lease located south of Maidstone.  This parcel is prospective for heavy oil in the Mannville Group.


The next public offering of petroleum and natural gas rights will be held on August 14, 2018.


SASK PARKS INTRODUCES YURT IN GREAT BLUE HERON PROVINCIAL PARK
Nature meets comfort in a brand new, Mongolian-style yurt located at Anglin Lake in Great Blue Heron Provincial Park.


“We are excited to offer this unique accommodation in our park,” Parks, Culture and Sport Minister Gene Makowsky said.  “The yurt is a great opportunity for guests to experience beautiful Anglin Lake in comfort and style with minimal packing and preparation required.  Visitors can enjoy the best of both worlds, taking in the lush forests, calm lakes and wildlife in the park while sleeping in a cozy bed in a sheltered area.”

The yurt comes equipped with many essentials so guests can relax and recharge without having to set up a tent or trailer.  The yurt sits on a large deck and is furnished with a queen-sized bed and two double-sized futons.  Also inside the yurt is a table with chairs, small fridge, electrical outlet, electric heater and battery-powered lamps.  Washrooms, showers and potable water taps are located nearby.


The yurt is ideal for anyone looking for a unique adventure, or for those who may not have much outdoor experience but are interested in a getaway beyond the city limits.

Visitors can immerse themselves in nature, while staying warm, sheltered and comfortable at the same time.  Guests will need to bring sleeping blankets and pillows, cooking equipment, dishes and utensils, camp stove and campfire chairs.


Reservations are open now and can be made by calling 306-982-4741.  The yurt is $95 per night.


For more information, visit 
www.tourismsaskatchewan.com/places-to-go/provincial-parks/yurt.

MOOSE JAW SHRINE CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL

ROAD WORK IN SOUTHEAST SASKATCHEWAN KICKS INTO HIGH GEAR


More than $29 million worth of construction work on more than 100 kilometres (km) of southeastern Saskatchewan highways is set to take place this week.


“Our government has made highways and infrastructure a priority for the people of Saskatchewan,” Highways and Infrastructure Minister David Marit said.  “We know the construction season is short and we have lots of work to do so, if you are travelling, please be patient, allow for extra time and respect the work zones.”


This week’s work in southeast Saskatchewan includes:

  • $7.5 million of surfacing on about 27 km of Highway 2 north of Moose Jaw;
  • $4.8 million of surfacing on about 30 km of Highway 13 near Weyburn;
  • $10 million of surfacing on about 28 km on Hwy 35 and 39 near Weyburn; and
  • $7.1 million of surfacing on about 25 km of Highway 36 south of Willow Bunch.

If you’re planning to travel, check the Highway Hotline at www.saskatchewan.ca/highwayhotline, which provides up-to-date information on construction, emergency road closures, the status of ferries, barges and other road activities.  Information is also available by calling 511.

A weekly highway construction update is also published on www.saskatchewan.ca/residents/transportation/highway-construction-projects/weekly-highway-construction-update to provide the travelling public with the latest details on projects underway to help plan safe and efficient travel.  You can also report a highway work zone signing problem by calling 306-244-5535.


Travellers need to obey signs, stay alert and slow to 60 km/hr through the work zone.  There may be cases in other work zones when workers are not present that require you to slow down.  A sharp pavement drop or loose stones during a seal coat are examples of hazards that warrant a slower posted speed.


The Government of Saskatchewan has invested more than $8 billion in transportation infrastructure since 2008, improving more than 12,000 km of Saskatchewan highways.

DECORATION DAY CENITAPH MEMORIAL CEREMONY

MORE THAN $1.2 MILLION IN CHARITABLE GAMING GRANTS PAID OUT


Volunteer fire departments, humane societies, amateur sports clubs and local service clubs are among 1,100 groups and organizations that received more than $1.2 million from the provincial government through its charitable gaming grant program this quarter.


“Saskatchewan communities are strong when its citizens step up and give their time as volunteers,” Minister Responsible for SLGA Gene Makowsky said.  “As a government we’re pleased to support volunteer organizations by enhancing their fundraising efforts with charitable gaming grants.”


Among the grants provided by SLGA this quarter: Estevan and surrounding area received $77,817; North Battleford and surrounding area: $71,282; Prince Albert and surrounding area: $62,739; Swift Current and surrounding area: $50,378; and Lloydminster and surrounding area: $37,239.


The grants are provided to groups and organizations that conduct licensed charitable gaming activities such as bingos, raffles, breakopen ticket sales as well as Texas Hold’em poker and Monte Carlo events.


A grant equivalent to 25 per cent of the net proceeds raised from the gaming activity is automatically provided to the groups and organizations when they submit their charitable gaming reports.


Crop Report for the Period May 29 to June 4, 2018

The majority of the province received much-needed moisture this past week, helping to alleviate concerns about dry field conditions.


The amount of rain varied across the province, with some southwestern areas receiving very little, while many fields in the southeast are saturated and flooded.  The Lampman area received 256 mm of rain.  Fields and roads are flooded in many areas of the southeast and it will be some time before they are dry enough to be accessed.  In contrast, the southwestern region remains very dry as it has received little rainfall over the past few months.  There are concerns that crop and hay yields in the region will be affected if rain does not arrive soon.


Topsoil moisture conditions have improved in much of the province, thanks to the recent rainfall.  Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 12 per cent surplus, 67 per cent adequate, 18 per cent short and three per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as seven per cent surplus, 63 per cent adequate, 25 per cent short and five per cent very short.


Seeding operations are nearing completion, although the rain will delay progress in some areas.  Ninety-six per cent of the crop is now seeded, up from 91 per cent last week and well ahead of the five-year (2013-2017) average of 90 per cent for this time of year.


Seeding is furthest advanced in the south, where 98 per cent of the crop is seeded.  Ninety-seven per cent is seeded in the west-central region, 96 per cent in the northeast and northwest and 93 per cent in the east-central region.


Crop growth is delayed in much of the province and most crops are behind their normal developmental stages for this time of year.  The majority of crop damage this past week was due to localized flooding, lack of moisture, hail, strong winds and insects such as flea beetles and cutworms.


Farmers are busy finishing seeding and completing in-crop pesticide applications when they can.


SaskPower received six reports of farm machinery coming in contact with electrical equipment in the last week.  The total for May was 154.  No incidents have been reported so far in June.  SaskPower reminds producers to be aware of their surroundings at all times and to plan ahead when moving equipment.  More safety information is available at www.saskpower.com/safety.


A complete, printable version of the Crop Report is available online at 
www.saskatchewan.ca/crop-report.
Follow the 2018 Crop Report on Twitter at @SKAgriculture.

TIM HORTONS CAMP DAY
Mayor Fraser Tolmie, Marie Wright and Warren Michelson with Tim Horton’s Staff at the Highway location on Thatcher Drive. 

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN MOOSE JAW

Friday June 8, 2018

What: Minto United Church Garage Sale

Time:  9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. 
Place:  Minto United Church

What: Steak Night Fundraiser for Stars Ambulance.

Time:   2:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. 
Place:  Carol’s Catering and Cafe

Saturday, June 9, 2018

What: South of the Bridge Day

Time:  9:00 a.m. 
Place: South Hill Fine Foods parking lot
9:00 a.m. – Pancake breakfast
9:00 a.m. -11:30 a.m.  South Hill Selfie Walking Bicycle Scavenger Hunt
9:30 – 12:00 p.m.  South Hill Heritage Trolley Tour by Donation
Go on a tour of historic sites of  South Hill on the tourism mj trolley.   Tours leave every half hour beginning at 9:30 a.m.  Kids activities in A.M. 

What: Minto United Church Garage Sale

Time:  9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. 
Place:  Minto United Church

What: Cheer Infinity Athletics – First Annual Garage Sale

Time:  9:00 a.m. 
Place: Moose Jaw Alliance Church
Rain or Shine! Outdoors in the parking lot if the weather is lovely. In the gym if it rains.
Cheer Infinity Athletics of Moose Jaw is having its First Annual Fundraising Garage Sale & Concession Stand. Money raised will be going to the local Jumpstart Program and CIA Scholarships for our current and/or future athletes.

What: Briercrest Heritage Day
Time:  10:00 a.m.
Place:  Briercrest & District Museum

For further information please visit Discover MJ – Community Events

What:  Made in Canada Fashion Show & Strawberry Social

Time:   1:00 p.m
Place:  WDM 

What: Professional Bull Riders (PBR)

Time:  7:00 p.m. 
Place:  Mosaic
$20 plus fees

 

Sunday, June 10, 2018

What:  Millers vs Melville

Time:   2:00 p.m. 
Place:   Ross Wells Park
  
UPCOMING EVENTS:

Habitat for Humanity 2nd Annual Gala

Sat. June 16

Cocktails @ 5:30 p.m.

Welcome @ 6:15 p.m.

Dinner @ 6:45 p.m.

Dancing @ 9:00 p.m.

Featuring The New Montagues

$60/ TICKET

Derek 306-692-5050



The Saskatchewan 55+ Games 

July 10th- 12th

Moose Jaw Express June 6, 2018

newsprint

Spring Session Ends with Many Bills Passed

The Spring Session of the Legislature ended last Thursday. Almost 50 bills were passed during the session.  Debate on some of these had begun in the Fall Session.  There were enjoyable times, and there were serious and sad times. I think it brought out the kid in all of us as we proclaimed our newest emblem, the Tyrannosaurus rex, as Saskatchewan’s Provincial Fossil.

The entire legislative assembly grieved with the people of Humboldt, the hockey community and all of Saskatchewan when the Humboldt Broncos horrific accident happened. We saw the city of Moose Jaw also express their support with the Evan Thomas benefit hockey event, the vigil at Vanier Collegiate, and other community events.  Our thoughts and prayers continue to be with all those affected by this tragedy.

Much work and deliberation went into legislation concerning the federally mandated legalization of cannabis. Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Authority will be responsible for the regulation and control of cannabis.  Legislation will prohibit the possession, consumption, or distribution of cannabis by minors under the age of 19, in line with the province’s legal age for consumption of alcohol. The Act will prohibit the consumption of cannabis in public places or in vehicles. Saskatchewan will have zero tolerance for all drivers for drug-impaired driving.  Anyone charged with a drug-impaired driving offence will receive an immediate license suspension until the charges are dealt with in court.

The Saskatchewan Technology Start-up Incentive legislation is designed to increase investment in early stage technology start-ups in our province. The incentive offers a 45 per cent non-refundable tax credit for individual and corporate equity investments in eligible technology start-up businesses. It will help enhance the growth, attraction and retention of start-ups and talent in the province.

As promised by our government last year, The School Choice Protection Act was passed.  This legislation will amend The Education Act in order to provide certainty to parents and students that the government can continue funding students who attend Catholic separate schools regardless of their religious affiliation.  The Government of Saskatchewan can now invoke section 33 of the Charter, commonly known as the notwithstanding clause, to allow The Education Act to operate notwithstanding sections 2(a) and 15 of the Charter.

Two other important pieces of legislation will protect vulnerable individuals. The Privacy Amendment Act will allow a person whose intimate image has been distributed without their consent, even if they consented to the image itself being taken or took that image themselves, to sue the person who distributed the image,. Plaintiffs will now have the option to proceed with an action in either small claims or the Court of Queen’s Bench.

The Traffic Safety Act amendment will make the consequences more severe for drivers who are impaired and who transport children. Drivers with blood alcohol content between .04 and .08 or who fail a field sobriety test will face a seven-day administrative driving suspension if they are transporting any child under the age of 16.

I look forward to spending more time in the constituency with the Spring Legislative Session completed. Moose Jaw is an active centre during June & July and I will be attending many community events. Please take time to say Hello if we cross paths, or stop by the office at 326 High Street West.

From the Desk of Warren Michelson June 1, 2018

June 1, 2018 View this email in your browser
shield FROM THE DESK OF WARREN MICHELSON, MLA

#40 SNOWBIRD SQUADRON CADETS CEREMONIAL REVIEW

 

             Emma Cherney

 


RESIDENTS REMINDED TO LEAVE YOUNG WILD ANIMALS ALONE

Seeing young animals such as fawns, ducklings, rabbits or songbirds can be exciting, but there are reasons to leave them alone, even if they appear helpless or lost.


In the majority of cases, these young animals are not abandoned or deserted, and the mother is nearby watching.  Young animals and birds are purposely placed into seclusion by their mothers to protect them from predators.  As an example, young deer or moose are virtually odorless making them less likely to be located by a predator.


Anytime a young wild animal comes into contact with humans, its chance for survival decreases significantly.


Wildlife may also carry and transmit infectious diseases to people, such as rabies or West Nile Virus.

It is illegal to take wild animals home.  Only wildlife rehabilitators are licensed to care for orphaned and injured animals.  They are trained to make sure animals are given appropriate care and nutrition so they have the best chance of survival when they are released back into the wild.

Government of Saskatchewan conservation officers want to emphasize a simple message to well-intentioned people who want to rescue what appear to be orphaned young animals this time of year – don’t touch them.


A young animal should only be picked up if the parent is found dead nearby, or in unnatural situations such as a young songbird found on a doorstep.  In that case, the young bird could be moved to the closest suitable habitat.


To determine if a deer fawn is truly orphaned, please consider these indicators:

  • Has it been lying in the same position for more than 10 hours?
  • Is it vocal?
  • Is it covered in insects?
  • Is it wet?  Being covered by the morning dew may indicate it has been there for a prolonged period.

If there are obvious signs of injury, or that it has been orphaned, contact your local conservation officer.


Residents are also reminded to steer clear of adult wildlife, such as deer or moose that sometimes wander into urban areas.  Large crowds will stress the animal, and this could lead to a potentially dangerous situation.  Give wildlife their space.


June is one of the peak months for vehicle accidents involving wildlife.  So it is important for drivers to slow down and watch for wildlife crossing the roadways.  Be more vigilant around dusk and in the evening, as animal movement increases after dark.


PHEASANT CHICKS

Pheasant chicks hatched at local schools and are to be released later this summer when the chicks have matured.

Legislative Session Wraps with New Legislation and Budget on Track

The spring sitting of the legislative session wrapped up today.  It was Premier Scott Moe’s first legislative session as Saskatchewan’s new Premier and he said the government focused on the priorities of Saskatchewan people.


“I’m honoured to have completed my first spring session as Premier and I will continue to stand up for Saskatchewan as we face important issues including the fight against the federal carbon tax,” Moe said.


During this spring session, the Government of Saskatchewan launched a constitutional reference case in the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal challenging the federal government’s ability to impose a carbon tax on the province.  The Government of Saskatchewan also continued to advocate for the construction of the federally-approved Trans Mountain pipeline.


“During this session, we also introduced and passed a budget that keeps our government on track to a return to balance next year, while still investing in the priorities of the people of Saskatchewan, like health care and education,” Moe said.


The government passed 60 pieces of legislation during the spring sitting, including:

  • Protecting the right to school choice by invoking the notwithstanding clause of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and legislation to provide certainty to parents and students that government can continue funding students who attend Catholic separate schools regardless of their religious affiliation;
  • The framework to allow the federal government’s legalization of cannabis;
  • Amended The Privacy Act for greater protection against the unauthorized electronic distribution of intimate images;
  • Legislation to make consequences more severe for drivers who are impaired and who transport children;
  • Legislation to allow the establishment of ride sharing services in Saskatchewan communities;
  • Creation of an interpersonal violence leave of 10 unpaid days;
  • Creation of a new provincial park in the Porcupine Hills area;
  • Value-added agriculture incentives to improve investment attraction; and
  • Updating animal protection enforcement.

“I think it was a good session for our government and the people of Saskatchewan, but now it’s time for MLAs to head back to our constituencies to continue listening to the people we represent,” Moe said.


CANNABIS RETAILERS SELECTED

The operators for the province’s 51 cannabis retail store permits have now been selected.  More than two-thirds of these successful applicants are from Saskatchewan or have operations in the province.


“This represents the next step in the process of having a privately-operated cannabis retail system carefully regulated by SLGA,” Minister Responsible for SLGA Gene Makowsky said.  “There was a lot of interest in the public Request for Proposal process, resulting in many new businesses that will invest in our province.”


The successful proponents were selected through a two phase Request for Proposal (RFP) process that began in March.  The first phase involved a screening for qualifications focused on financial and sales/inventory tracking systems.  All those that qualified entered the second phase of the process which was a lottery draw to select the successful operators.  KPMG was engaged to provide oversight and monitor the entire RFP process.


The successful proponents have 45 days to begin the permitting process.  As a condition of their permit, retail cannabis permittees must be operating within 12 months of legalization.  Permits will not take effect until legalization occurs.


Cannabis retail stores must be standalone operations, selling only cannabis, cannabis accessories and ancillary items as defined by SLGA.  Alcohol sales will not be permitted in cannabis stores.  Cannabis retail locations are subject to local municipal zoning bylaws.


The included backgrounder lists the successful proponents and the communities where they will operate.

THE STORM THAT LEFT A FAIR AMOUNT OF HAIL BEHIND

REPORT FROM THE LEGISLATURE


The spring sitting of the legislature focused on the priorities of Saskatchewan people as we face important issues.


The fight against the federal carbon tax continues with the Government of Saskatchewan launching a constitutional reference case in the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal challenging the Government of Canada’s ability to impose a carbon tax on the province.


The Government of Saskatchewan also continued to advocate for the construction of the federally-approved Trans Mountain pipeline.


During this session, we also introduced and passed a budget that keeps our government on track to a return to balance next year, while still investing in the priorities of the people of Saskatchewan.


The government passed 60 pieces of legislation during the spring sitting, including:

  • Protecting the right to school choice by invoking the notwithstanding clause of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and legislation to provide certainty to parents and students that government can continue funding students who attend Catholic separate schools regardless of their religious affiliation;
  • The framework to allow the federal government’s legalization of cannabis;
  • Amendments to The Privacy Act for greater protection against the unauthorized electronic distribution of intimate images;
  • Legislation to make consequences more severe for drivers who are impaired and who transport children;
  • Legislation to allow the establishment of ride sharing services in Saskatchewan communities;
  • Creation of an interpersonal violence leave of 10 unpaid days;
  • Creation of a new provincial park in the Porcupine Hills area;
  • Value-added agriculture incentives to improve investment attraction; and
  • Updating animal protection enforcement.

The spring session was Premier Scott Moe’s first as Saskatchewan’s new Premier. This was also the first session for the new Leader of the Opposition.


The spring sitting was a time for renewal.


On that very first day, the new NDP Leader stood in his place and stated that he wanted to “do politics differently”. However, after 42 sitting days, it is clear that “doing politics differently” looks a lot like the same old NDP.


The Opposition failed to tell Saskatchewan people how they would create jobs and grow our economy. In fact, the only plan put forward was the Leader’s platform which proposes $2.5 billion a year in new spending with absolutely no plan to pay for it.


Through the spring sitting, the Opposition continued to support the Justin Trudeau carbon tax being imposed on families and businesses in our province, and their leader even called our fight against the carbon tax “a pointless crusade”.


The spring sitting was a good session for our government and the people of Saskatchewan. We now turn our full attention back to our constituencies to continue listening and standing up for the people we represent.


HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY IN FULL SWING IN THE SOUTHWEST


A $7.1 million surfacing project on Highway 4 near Cadillac and an $8.3 million paving project on Highway 42 near Eyebrow have now been completed.  This is on top of about $15 million worth of highway and bridge work, which is currently underway in the southwest part of the province.


“Our government continues to invest in highway and infrastructure projects that improve safety for people travelling in southwestern Saskatchewan, with this in mind, I urge travellers to follow the signage, slow down and respect the work zones,” Highways and Infrastructure Minister David Marit said.  “With summer weather on its way and people beginning to head out to the lake, we are pleased to announce the trip along Highway 42 to Lake Diefenbaker will be much smoother.”


Some of the other highway and infrastructure projects in the southwest this week include:

  • Paving on Highway 4 north of Swift Current to Stewart Valley;
  • Bridge work on Highway 4 over the South Saskatchewan River at Saskatchewan Landing;
  • Surfacing near Maple Creek on Highway 21 between the junctions of Highways 221 and 271; and
  • Surfacing on Highway 32 northwest of Cabri to the Shackleton Access.

If you’re planning to travel, check the Highway Hotline at

www.saskatchewan.ca/highwayhotline, which provides up-to-date information on construction, emergency road closures, the status of ferries, barges and other road activities.  Information is also available by calling 511.


A weekly highway construction update is also published on 
www.saskatchewan.ca/residents/transportation/highway-construction-projects/weekly-highway-construction-update to provide the travelling public with the latest details on projects underway to help plan safe and efficient travel.  You can also report a highway work zone signing problem by calling 306-244-5535.


Travellers need to obey signs, stay alert and slow to 60 km/hr through the work zone.  There may be cases when workers are not present that still require you to slow down.  A sharp pavement drop or loose stones during a seal coat are examples of hazards that warrant a slower posted speed.


The Government of Saskatchewan has invested more than $8 billion in transportation infrastructure since 2008, improving more than 12,000 km of Saskatchewan highways.


CROP REPORT FOR THE PERIOD May 22 TO 28, 2018

Thanks to another week of relatively good conditions, 91 per cent of the crop is now in the ground.  This is up from 70 per cent last week and remains well ahead of the five-year (2013-2017) seeding average of 81 per cent for this time of year.


The southwest region is the most advanced with 95 per cent of the crop seeded.  Ninety-three per cent is seeded in the southeast, 92 per cent in the west-central region, 90 per cent in the northwest, 87 per cent in the northeast and 86 per cent in the east-central region.


Ninety-eight per cent of lentils, 94 per cent of durum, 92 per cent of spring wheat, 90 per cent of soybeans, 88 per cent of canola, 85 per cent of barley and 84 per cent of flax have now been seeded.


Scattered rain showers brought varying amounts of rain this past week, helping to temporarily alleviate concerns of dry field conditions.  Rainfall ranged from trace amounts to 72 mm in the Humboldt area with many areas reporting about 25 mm or less.  While significant rain is still needed in the majority of the province to help crops emerge and hay land and pasture establish, some areas in the northeast have excess moisture.


Topsoil moisture conditions have slightly improved with recent rainfall.  Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on crop land are rated as one per cent surplus, 51 per cent adequate, 36 per cent short and 12 per cent very short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 38 per cent adequate, 44 per cent short and 18 per cent very short.


Overall, emerged crops are in poor-to-good condition, but emergence has been patchy and delayed by dry field conditions.  The majority of crop damage this past week was caused by strong winds, lack of moisture and insects such as flea beetles and cutworms in canola.  Localized hail was also reported in some areas.


Farmers are busy finishing up seeding, picking rocks and starting in-crop pesticide applications.


SaskPower says there were 15 reported cases of farm machinery contacting electrical equipment in the last week.  That brings the total for May to 143.  Most farm-related incidents happen during seeding.  SaskPower reminds producers to be aware of their surroundings at all times and plan ahead.  More safety information is available at www.saskpower.com/safety.


A complete, printable version of the Crop Report is available online at 
www.saskatchewan.ca/crop-reportFollow the 2018 Crop Report on Twitter at @SKAgriculture.


WHAT’S HAPPENING IN MOOSE JAW

Friday June 1, 2018

What: Millers vs Swift Current

Time:   7:00 p.m. 
Place:  Ross Well Park

Saturday, June 2, 2018

What: Mining wk 50th Annual Emergency Response/Mine Rescue Skills Competition

Time:   6:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.  
Place:  Mosaic

What:  YMCA Healthy Kids Day

Time:  10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. 
Place:  Fairford St. Location 

What: Moose Jaw Shrine Club 9th Annual Children’s Festival
Time:  10:00 a.m.
Place:  Western Development Museum

Magic acts, Singalongs, Petting Zoo, Carnival Games and Ride Thomas the Train! Face Painting, Hotdogs, Drinks and Cotton Candy! Everyone is welcome to Tour the Museum as well! Free Tickets available at Tourism Moose Jaw, South Hill Fine Foods, Western Development Museum, Western Dodge and Heritage Insurance

Sunday, June 3, 2018

What:  Sukanen Ship – Spring Fling Show n Shine

Time:   10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. 
Place:   Sukanen Ship  Museum 

What:   Annual Decoration Day

Time:    10:30 a.m. 
Place:    Rosedale Cemetery 
Short service to follow at 11:00  a.m.
Parade at 2:00 p.m. – Crescent Park
Cenotaph – 1:45 p.m.
BBQ Hamburger and salad

 

UPCOMING EVENTS:

Keep MJ Alive! – Doug Griffith
Wed. June 6
7:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Performing Arts Theatre
$25/ ticket – MJ & District Chamber of Commerce

Professional Bull Riders (PBR)

Sat. June 9

7:00 p.m.

$20 plus fees



Habitat for Humanity 2nd Annual Gala

Sat. June 16

Cocktails @ 5:30 p.m.

Welcome @ 6:15 p.m.

Dinner @ 6:45 p.m.

Dancing @ 9:00 p.m.

Featuring The New Montagues

$60/ TICKET

Derek 306-692-5050


The Saskatchewan 55+ Games 
July 10th- 12th

Report from the Legislature May 31, 2018

Summer at the Legislative Building

The spring sitting of the legislature focused on the priorities of Saskatchewan people as we face important issues.

The fight against the federal carbon tax continues with the Government of Saskatchewan launching a constitutional reference case in the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal challenging the Government of Canada’s ability to impose a carbon tax on the province.

The Government of Saskatchewan also continued to advocate for the construction of the federally-approved Trans Mountain pipeline.

During this session, we also introduced and passed a budget that keeps our government on track to a return to balance next year, while still investing in the priorities of the people of Saskatchewan.

The government passed 60 pieces of legislation during the spring sitting, including:

  • Protecting the right to school choice by invoking the notwithstanding clause of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and legislation to provide certainty to parents and students that government can continue funding students who attend Catholic separate schools regardless of their religious affiliation;
  • The framework to allow the federal government’s legalization of cannabis;
  • Amendments to The Privacy Act for greater protection against the unauthorized electronic distribution of intimate images;
  • Legislation to make consequences more severe for drivers who are impaired and who transport children;
  • Legislation to allow the establishment of ride sharing services in Saskatchewan communities;
  • Creation of an interpersonal violence leave of 10 unpaid days;
  • Creation of a new provincial park in the Porcupine Hills area;
  • Value-added agriculture incentives to improve investment attraction; and
  • Updating animal protection enforcement.

The spring session was Premier Scott Moe’s first as Saskatchewan’s new Premier. This was also the first session for the new Leader of the Opposition.  The spring sitting was a time for renewal.

On that very first day, the new NDP Leader stood in his place and stated that he wanted to “do politics differently”. However, after 42 sitting days, it is clear that “doing politics differently” looks a lot like the same old NDP.

The Opposition failed to tell Saskatchewan people how they would create jobs and grow our economy. In fact, the only plan put forward was the Leader’s platform which proposes $2.5 billion a year in new spending with absolutely no plan to pay for it.

Through the spring sitting, the Opposition continued to support the Justin Trudeau carbon tax being imposed on families and businesses in our province, and their leader even called our fight against the carbon tax “a pointless crusade”.

The spring sitting was a good session for our government and the people of Saskatchewan. We now turn our full attention back to our constituencies to continue listening and standing up for the people we represent.

Moose Jaw Express May 30, 2018

newsprint

Mining Helping Saskatchewan to Grow Stronger

The mining industry is extremely important to the people and the economy of our province. The industry provides over 30,500 jobs in Saskatchewan with mineral sales valued at approximately $6.6 billion in 2017. Our province recognizes this significant contribution by declaring May 27 to June 2, 2018 as Saskatchewan Mining Week. The Saskatchewan Mining Association organizes this special week annually to recognize and celebrate the importance of the industry to our province.

Events are scheduled throughout the week and around the province, including two events in Moose Jaw. The Chamber of Commerce has scheduled a breakfast May 30 with a presentation by Kyle Leadbeater, Superintendent, Dry End Production at K+S Potash Canada. The final event of the week is traditionally the Emergency Response/Mine Rescue Skills Competition. I’m excited that the 50th Annual Competition will be happening here at Mosaic Place and Moose Jaw Exhibition Park.

Saskatchewan is the largest potash producer in the world, home to almost half of the world’s potash reserves, and is the world’s second largest primary uranium producer, with a catalogue of other minerals such as gold, base metals, clays, coal and diamonds. Mining provides valuable employment across our province, including several Northern Saskatchewan communities.

Among 85 jurisdictions, the Mining Journal’s 2017 World Risk Report has Saskatchewan as the top-ranked jurisdiction in terms of places in the world to invest resource capital. Natural Resources Canada indicated that Saskatchewan ranks second nationally in exploration expenditures. In the past decade, $2.87 billion has been invested in mineral exploration in our province with an estimated $177 million invested in 2017.

 

One year ago, K+S Potash Canada officially opened of its Bethune potash solution mine, Saskatchewan’s first new potash mine in nearly 50 years. SSR Mining Inc. is planning a seven-year, $90 million expansion for its Seabee gold operation located 125 kilometers north east of La Ronge.  Saskatchewan’s only active gold mine, Seabee had a new record for production in 2017, for the third year in a row. It is on track to meet, or exceed, last year’s totals in 2018.

Our government continues to work for the people of Saskatchewan by investing in our mining industry. The Ministry of Energy and Resources’ budget has increased by 1.5 per cent and includes a new four-year Mineral Development Strategy to create an incentive to increase the amount of mineral exploration in Northern Saskatchewan. The development strategy will focus on base metals, precious metals, and diamond commodities which have significant, unrealized potential to help grow and diversify Saskatchewan’s mineral sector.

Innovation Saskatchewan is funding research for new genomics technologies that will advance the mining sector, improve mineral processing and water treatment, and reduce environmental impacts from closed mines.

Mosaic and K+S potash mines provide employment for many people living in the Moose Jaw area. Their contributions to our local economy and their support of many charitable local projects and programs, is much appreciated. Saskatchewan Mining Week helps us to recognize and be more aware of these many contributions.